3d printer for food making

3D Printer Definition That You Should Know

Looking for 3d printer definition? 3D printing is an innovative technology that lets you create a physical object from a digital model. 3D printing is a process whereby a 3D design is turned into a real object. First, software is used to slice the 3D design into layers, and then the design is printed layer by layer on a 3D printer. Because each object is built up uniquely, 3D printing is great if you want to make unique and customized items or small series of objects. In contrast, other processes, such as injection molding are much better at making thousands or millions of copies of something cheaply.

3D printing is any of various processes in which material is joined or solidified under computer control to create a three-dimensional object,[1]with material being added together (such as liquid molecules or powder grains being fused together). 3D printing is used in both rapid prototyping and additive manufacturing. Objects can be of almost any shape or geometry and typically are produced using digital model data from a 3D model or another electronic data source such as an Additive Manufacturing File (AMF) file (usually in sequential layers). There are many different technologies, like stereolithography (SLA) or fused deposit modeling (FDM)[2]. Thus, unlike material removed from a stock in the conventional machining process, 3D printing or Additive Manufacturing builds a three-dimensional object from a computer-aided design (CAD) model or AMF file, usually by successively adding material layer by layer (WIKIPEDIA)

A lot’s changed since then, and today 3D printers offer amazing results and let you create anything you can imagine. The technical term for 3D printing is Additive Manufacturing. However, the public almost exclusively uses the term 3D printing. Hope you find it useful, that’s 3d printer definition from our side.

How does 3D printing work?

3D printing is also called additive manufacturing, because unlike the traditional subtractive manufacturing, 3D printing doesn’t remove material, it adds it, layer after layer.

In order to print something, first you’ll need a 3D model of the object you want to create, which you can design in a 3D modeling program (CAD – Computer Aided Design), or use a 3D scanner to scan the object you want to print. There are also more simple options, like searching online on Youmagine.com for 3D models that have been created and shared by other people.

But how does the printer work? Although there are several 3D printing technologies, most of them create the object by laying down many successive thin layers of a material. Usually, desktop 3D printers use plastic filaments (1) which are fed into the printer by the feeder (2). The filament is melted in the print head (3) which extrudes the material onto the build plate (4) creating your object layer by layer. Once the printer starts printing, all you have to do is wait – it’s that easy.

3D Printing Technologies

Contrary to popular belief, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach to 3D printing. In general, 3D printing technologies can be split up into 2 groups: Direct and indirect 3D printing. The main difference lies in the fact that the design is made from 3D printing (direct) or 3D printing was used in the process of creating your model (indirect).

3D Printing Process

3D printable models may be created with a computer-aided design (CAD) package, via a 3D scanner, or by a plain digital camera and photogrammetry software. 3D printed models created with CAD result in reduced errors and can be corrected before printing, allowing verification in the design of the object before it is printed.[28] The manual modeling process of preparing geometric data for 3D computer graphics is similar to plastic arts such as sculpting. 3D scanning is a process of collecting digital data on the shape and appearance of a real object, creating a digital model based on it.